Tweens Thriving in the Web and What does that Mean?

For children ages 10 to 14 who use the Internet, the computer is a bigger draw than the TV set, according to a study recently released by DoubleClick Performics, a search marketing company. The study found that 83 percent of Internet users in that age bracket spent an hour or more online a day, but only 68 percent devoted that much time to television.

The study found that the children often did research online before making a purchase (or bugging their parents to make one). The big exception to this rule was apparel: like many grown-ups, the children said they preferred to choose their clothes at a store.

Performics reported that some corners of the Internet were more popular with the children than others. While 72 percent of the children online belonged to a social networking site (usually MySpace), 60 percent of them said they rarely or never read blogs.

Drilling Down – Preferring the Web Over Watching TV – NYTimes.com

What I’d like to know is this:

  • What percentage of those kids have parents that can site the top five internet destinations that their kids frequent? 
  • And how many of those kids claim “friends” online that they’ve never met?  And how many of those kids view content that they would NEVER tell their parents about – how often, as well? 
  • And how many of those kids have found educational-information empowering, social experiences empowering, and self esteem empowerment? 
  • And how about the opposite? 
  • And what abilities are kids developing to deal with these new frontier experiences that we (as adults, educators, parents, etc) have been unable to teach/understand due to our own lack-of-youth-based-experiences?

Actually – there are like a thousand questions.  How about YOU chime in…

What kind of questions would you like to know regarding HIGH WEB USAGE tweens??  Please add in the comments section.  These kinds of questions could totally bring up some GREAT conversation starters – and great rambles from everyone.

Blogged with the Flock Browser

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  1. August 26, 2008 at 9:30 pm

    Since the MySpace minimum age is 13 and Facebook is 14, I’m curious as to why there are so many parents allowing their children on these sites. There is certainly not a lack of social communities for tweens and young teens that offer a safer, more private and moderated experience. Do parents know that their child’s social profiles are indexed by all the major search engines? Have they helped their teens understand the privacy filters that these sites offer? Do they audit the information their teen provides online to protect them from predators?

    I use parental blocking software to restrict my 11-year old’s visits to these sites and the time she spends online. But I also get a heads up about the types of sites she’s visiting or trying to visit. Recently, I discovered that she was attempting to visit peer-to-peer sharing sites and watch video from the kids’ show ‘Avatar.” This led us to a conversation about the legalities of watching “leaked” video. A good learning experience for both of us. She’s a good kid, but file sharing is not a topic that comes up in school.

    My daughter might influence My online purchases, but I’m stunned by the number of tweens and teens reporting that they shop online. Do their parents give them permission to use the charge card? Yikes! I hope that opens up discussions about web security and identity theft.

    I think what makes me cringe is the thought that our tweens and teens are out there navigating these new technologies alone!

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